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Can your dog REALLY tell the time?

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Can your dog REALLY tell the time?
Can your dog REALLY tell the time?

Do our dogs really have the ability to tell the time?

Why are there dogs that wake up their owners at the same time every day? How can they know exactly when it is time to eat or go for a walk? Can they really sense when a family member is coming home? The answer is yes.

Not only is it that man’s best friends are creatures of habit, but they also have the ability to know when they have to do certain things.

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One of the references that dogs have to know what time it is are the day and night cycles, which are reflected in the changes in light intensity and temperature. However, their bodies have other mechanisms to quantify the passage of time, as National Geographic explains, and one of them is in their nose – which actually behaves like a real clock.

Dogs’ sense of smell is 10,000 to 100,000 times more powerful than humans, allowing them to detect changes in the environment that people are not even remotely aware of. With this highly developed sense, they can capture the unique smell of each individual, thanks to the particles that come off the skin and remain in the air.

Although this aroma fades over time, dogs can capture these particles by through their nose – which is capable of calculating the concentration of the particles. This allows them, for example, to understand when someone left home and, in the event that household members follow regular hours, when they will return.

In addition, it must be taken into account that the odours in a room move throughout the day due to the currents and movements of hot and cold air. This allows dogs to ‘smell the weather.’ These cycles allow them to know how many hours have elapsed since a certain activity and anticipate when it is time to repeat it or perform another.

In addition, dogs are great observers and, although this is not strictly related to the passing of hours, it allows them to anticipate what event is going to occur. Thus, the expressions or the gestures of the face allow man’s best friend to know what is going to happen next, such as a bath, a walk or a meal.


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Can your dog REALLY tell the time?

Published

on

can-your-dog-really tell-the-time?
Can your dog REALLY tell the time?
Can your dog REALLY tell the time?

Do our dogs really have the ability to tell the time?

Why are there dogs that wake up their owners at the same time every day? How can they know exactly when it is time to eat or go for a walk? Can they really sense when a family member is coming home? The answer is yes.

Not only is it that man’s best friends are creatures of habit, but they also have the ability to know when they have to do certain things.

One of the references that dogs have to know what time it is are the day and night cycles, which are reflected in the changes in light intensity and temperature. However, their bodies have other mechanisms to quantify the passage of time, as National Geographic explains, and one of them is in their nose – which actually behaves like a real clock.

Dogs’ sense of smell is 10,000 to 100,000 times more powerful than humans, allowing them to detect changes in the environment that people are not even remotely aware of. With this highly developed sense, they can capture the unique smell of each individual, thanks to the particles that come off the skin and remain in the air.

Although this aroma fades over time, dogs can capture these particles by through their nose – which is capable of calculating the concentration of the particles. This allows them, for example, to understand when someone left home and, in the event that household members follow regular hours, when they will return.

In addition, it must be taken into account that the odours in a room move throughout the day due to the currents and movements of hot and cold air. This allows dogs to ‘smell the weather.’ These cycles allow them to know how many hours have elapsed since a certain activity and anticipate when it is time to repeat it or perform another.

In addition, dogs are great observers and, although this is not strictly related to the passing of hours, it allows them to anticipate what event is going to occur. Thus, the expressions or the gestures of the face allow man’s best friend to know what is going to happen next, such as a bath, a walk or a meal.


Thank you for reading, and don’t forget to check The Euro Weekly News for all your up-to-date local and international news stories, and remember, you can also follow us on Facebook and Instagram.


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Pets

WARNING: Vets warn against dog boots amid heavy snowfall forecast

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WARNING: Vets warn against dog boots amid heavy snowfall forecast
WARNING: Vets warn against dog boots amid heavy snowfall forecast. Image – Pixabay

Vets are warning pet owners not to put their dogs in boots amid heavy snow forecast for this weekend.

The Met Office has predicted heavy snowfall in parts this weekend and vets are warning against owners putting their dogs in boots in a bid to protect their paws from snow, ice and grit.

However, tails.com head vet Sean McCormack has said the trending accessories can cause more harm than good.

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Sean said: “Generally, dog boots will not cause your dog any pain, however, they might feel uncomfortable, which is why I advise against purchasing them.”

“Dogs find it extremely difficult to adapt to wearing boots, as they make their paws heavier and restrict movement.”

“One of the most common problems with dog boots is that pet parents find it difficult to recognise when they don’t fit their dog correctly. This can cause a lot of discomfort for your pet and make walking very challenging for them.”

“Though considered fashionable to some, most dogs don’t need any form of footwear.”

Dog’s paws are robust enough to withstand the UK’s icy conditions, having adapted to the cold and being designed to survive outdoors.

Sean added: “Body temperature plays a big part in this, as the pads draw warm blood to the skin to keep them warm. The tissue on a dog’s paw pad is built to protect them from temperatures as low as -35 degrees.”

“The tissue on the dog’s paw is the toughest skin on the entire body and the gripping texture allows them to maintain traction and balance. When boots are worn, dogs lose grip and the surface becomes slippy, making it harder to walk for your pup – it’s a similar experience when a human wears socks on a slippery floor.”

Saying this, paw pads are not indestructible and are more prone to cracks and cuts in the winter months.

Sean advises looking out for signs that your pooch is in discomfort, such as licking their feet a lot and picking up their paws when walking.

“Paw balm or petroleum jelly-based products can help to keep your dog’s paws safe in winter,” Sean suggested. “Before you head out on a walk, coat the balm on your dog’s paws to create a barrier that will help to prevent snow, ice and other road chemicals from getting in their paw cracks.”

“Additionally, this will help to keep their pads hydrated, which is particularly important during winter when the air becomes dry. When you return from your walk, wipe it off!”

He added: “Grooming plays a huge role in protecting your pup’s paws during the colder period. Trimming the long hairs on your dog’s paws will make it harder for ice, snow and de-icing products to cling and dry on their skin causing irritation. Be extra careful when trimming these areas, or take your pet to a professional grooming service.”

“When walking during winter, dogs are exposed to road salt, which can be extremely dangerous, as it can irritate the skin, causing dryness, cracking and even burns to the pads.”

“Even more dangerous for dogs, if they lick it from their paws or fur, they can ingest the chemicals, which can be toxic. These harmful products sit on their fur and paws, so it’s important that when you return from walking your dog that you clean their paw pads to remove any chemicals.”


Thank you for reading, and don’t forget to check The Euro Weekly News for all your up-to-date local and international news stories, and remember, you can also follow us on Facebook and Instagram.

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Pets

Couple reunited with dog after it was stolen and sold to another family

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Couple reunited with dog after it was stolen and sold to another family
Couple reunited with dog after it was stolen and sold to another family. Image – Johanna Kerwirn Twitter

A couple has been reunited with their beloved pet after he was stolen and sold to another family.

A couple in Essex, London, has been reunited with their beloved pet after he was stolen and sold to another family.

Russian Bolonka, Björn, was stolen on November 6 after thieves broke into his owners’ van that was parked at Bluewater shopping centre in Essex.

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Micheal Fox and Johanna Kerwien had left the dog inside the van and when they returned the windows had been smashed. Björn was gone, along with a laptop and some personal belongings.

The couple reported the incident to the police and launched an appeal to get their dog back, making several video posts for his safe return which were shared across social media. However, there was no success.

Five weeks later, the pair received a phone call from a woman in East Ham who had purchased an adult male Bolonka as a Christmas present for her daughter.

She had shown a photograph of the dog to a colleague at work, who immediately recognised him as the dog they had seen an appeal for on social media.

The woman had kept Björn at home for two weeks before realising it was the stolen dog, she then sent the couple images of the pet she had purchased.

Michael said: “We could tell immediately it was him. She then offered to meet us to give him back, as she obviously didn’t want to keep a stolen dog.”

“She seemed genuine.”

“She said she had bought him from someone who had bought him from someone else who was selling him because they hadn’t bonded with him.”

They were reunited with the beloved Björn on Monday, December 13.

Image – Johanna Kerwirn Twitter

Johanna said that they had “a constant knot in our chest, worrying about how our little guy is being treated” since he disappeared.

The couple had travelled to Sweden to pick the animal up as a puppy, saying the dog they had enjoyed two years with was like a child to them.

Police investigations are still ongoing and it is unknown what Björn endured while he was missing.

Johanna said: “We took him to the vet this morning as he seems to have been sitting outside in the wet for a long time because he has yeast infections on his feet and in his ear.”

“His hair was so matted that I had to shave his entire body.”

“But thankfully, he’s almost back to his happy self again.”

In Sweden, where Johanna is from, dog thefts are unheard of.

She said: “My mum breeds German Shepherds for the police. We have to make so many background checks for people to buy them in the first place, so the puppies don’t end up in the wrong hands.”

“In Sweden, people leave their dogs in their cars while they go food shopping with the boot cracked open because thefts just don’t happen.”

“I 100 per cent thought he was safe.”

“‘But now I know how rife these crimes are.”

The couple sought support from The Missing Paw Team UK, a volunteer group that works with local authorities to find missing pets and reunite them with their owners.

Vicki Hudson, who was involved in investigating the dog’s disappearance, said: “If you buy a puppy, you have to buy one which has been microchipped in the first eight weeks of its life, and that needs to be registered with a DEFRA-approved database.”

“If you’re buying a dog anywhere other than through a rescue shelter or as a puppy, then take that dog to a vet to make sure the dog is healthy, but to get the dog scanned to make sure you don’t have a stolen dog.”


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